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dc.rights.licenseCC-BY-NC-ND
dc.contributor.advisorMedeiros, P. de
dc.contributor.authorEl Khairat, A.
dc.date.accessioned2008-04-29T13:14:03Z
dc.date.available2008-04-29T13:14:03Z
dc.date.issued2008
dc.identifier.urihttps://studenttheses.uu.nl/handle/20.500.12932/8534
dc.description.abstractRe-considering the relationship between Europe and the rest of the world is one of the dominating features in the three novels that I have chosen to analyse in this study: Season of Migration to the North by Sudan’s most famous author, Tayyib Salleh; The Game of Forgetting, a novel written by the Moroccan critic and novelist Mohammed Berrada; and L’Amour La Fantasia, an outstanding narrative by the Algerian activist and filmmaker Assia Djebar. In this thesis, I will discuss the relationship between Europe and the Arab world, focusing more particularly on the genre of the novel as a form of writing back to the centre and resisting the supremacy of European patterns of knowledge. I will also try to show that the three novels’ problematisation of European colonial history serves many purposes, some of which are to establish a dialogue with, and react against, European models. In this respect, four issues will be highlighted, namely (a) Narrative Writing in Contemporary Arabic Literature, (b) The Relationship between Europe and the Arab World, (c) The Myth of Nationalism and the Production of Cultural Memory, (d) The Subaltern Writes Back.
dc.description.sponsorshipUtrecht University
dc.language.isoen
dc.titleNarrating the Empire: Nationalism, Memory and Gender in Arab Postcolonial Novel, the Case of Tayyib Salleh’s Season of Migration to the North, Mohammed Berrada’s The Game of Forgetting and Assia Djebar’s L’Amour, la Fantasia
dc.type.contentMaster Thesis
dc.rights.accessrightsOpen Access
dc.subject.keywordsNationalism
dc.subject.keywordsMemory
dc.subject.keywordsGender
dc.subject.courseuuLiterary Studies: Literature in the Modern Age


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