Show simple item record

dc.rights.licenseCC-BY-NC-ND
dc.contributor.advisorDoornen, Lorenz van
dc.contributor.authorLaub, M.
dc.contributor.authorLeeuwen, S.P.G. van
dc.date.accessioned2008-10-08T17:11:15Z
dc.date.available2008-10-08
dc.date.available2008-10-08T17:11:15Z
dc.date.issued2008
dc.identifier.urihttps://studenttheses.uu.nl/handle/20.500.12932/2006
dc.description.abstractCurrent medical treatment of patients with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) is not entirely satisfactory. An alternative, but not yet fully understood, way to improve attention and impulsivity is neurofeedback training. This procedure is aimed at learning to regulate brain wave activity. Previous studies reported significant benefits of neurofeedback training, using active and passive control groups, but double-blind sham controlled studies are lacking so far. This study attempts to address this problem. Participants in this study were randomly assigned to either a treatment group, or a sham group and eventually received 16 20-minute sessions of neurofeedback. The results indicate several (trends towards) main effects, but no group x time interactions for neurofeedback treatment are found. From these results it can be concluded that 16 sessions of neurofeedback have no effect above placebo on measures of attention and impulsivity
dc.description.sponsorshipUtrecht University
dc.format.extent292311 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen
dc.titleThe effect of Neurofeedback training on healthy individuals as measured by objective and self report measures of attention and impulsivity, when compared to a sham control condition.
dc.type.contentMaster Thesis
dc.rights.accessrightsOpen Access
dc.subject.keywordsNeurofeedback
dc.subject.keywordsAttention
dc.subject.keywordsImpulsivity
dc.subject.courseuuKlinische psychologie


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record